Download Ebook, Epub, Textbook, quickly and easily or read online full books anytime and anywhere. Click GET BOOK button and get unlimited access by create free account.

Title Deafness Gesture and Sign Language in the 18th Century French Philosophy
Author Josef Fulka
Publisher John Benjamins Publishing Company
Release 2020-04-15
Category Language Arts & Disciplines
Total Pages 166
ISBN 9027261482
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

The book represents a historical overview of the way the topic of gesture and sign language has been treated in the 18th century French philosophy. The texts treated are grouped into several categories based on the view they present of deafness and gesture. While some of those texts obviously view deafness and sign language in negative terms, i.e. as deficiency, others present deafness essentially as difference, i.e. as a set of competences that might provide some insights into how spoken language works. One of the arguments of the book is that these two views of deafness and sign language still represent two dominant paradigms present in the current debates on the issue. The aim of the book, therefore, is not only to provide a historical overview but to trace what might be called a “history of the present”.

The Disability Studies Reader by Lennard J. Davis

Title The Disability Studies Reader
Author Lennard J. Davis
Publisher Psychology Press
Release 1997
Category Political Science
Total Pages 468
ISBN 9780415914710
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

The Disability Studies Reader collects, for the first time, representative texts from the newly emerging field of disability studies. This volume represents a major advance in presenting the most important writings about disability with an emphasis on those writers working from a materialist and postmodernist perspective. Drawing together experts in cultural studies, literary criticism, sociology, biology, the visual arts, pedagogy and post-colonial studies, the collection provides a comprehensive approach to the issue of disability. Contributors include Erving Goffman, Susan Sontag, Michelle Fine and Susan Wendell.

Title Theology and Human Flourishing
Author Mike Higton
Publisher Wipf and Stock Publishers
Release 2011-11-04
Category Religion
Total Pages 322
ISBN 1608997553
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

This collection of essays is a celebration of the work of Timothy Gorringe. Like his theology, it is animated by a delighted and critical engagement with the diverse facets of human social life, and by a passionate concern to wrestle with the Bible and the Christian tradition in pursuit of human flourishing. The built environment, politics, education, art: these essays by leading Christian theologians ask what it means for Christian theology to concern itself with, to immerse itself in, and to risk critical commentary on, each of these and more. The collection follows the same rhythm that animates Gorringe's work: insistent attention to the Christian tradition in the light of the particular contexts where human flourishing is imagined, fought for, embodied and betrayed; and a critical, constructive and celebratory examination of those contexts in the light of the Christian tradition. The contributions are very diverse, touching on everything from city life to human curiosity, poverty to genocide--but they are united by a passion to make theological sense of human flourishing.

Constructing Deafness by Susan Gregory

Title Constructing Deafness
Author Susan Gregory
Publisher Burns & Oates
Release 1991-01
Category Deaf
Total Pages 319
ISBN 9780861870578
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Title Culturally Affirmative Psychotherapy With Deaf Persons
Author Neil S. Glickman
Publisher Routledge
Release 2013-10-23
Category Psychology
Total Pages 304
ISBN 131778085X
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

The impetus for this volume is the growing awareness within the mental health and larger community of a culturally affirmative model for understanding and assisting deaf people. In contrast to the "medical-pathological" model which treats deafness as a disability, the "cultural" model guides us to view deaf persons in relation to the deaf community--a group of people with a common language, culture, and collective identity. A primary tenant of culturally affirmative psychotherapy is to understand and respect such differences, not to eradicate them. The contributors to this volume present a practical and realistic model of providing culturally affirmative counseling and psychotherapy for deaf people. The three dimensions of this model have been delineated by the multicultural counseling literature. These dimensions assert that culturally affirmative psychotherapy with deaf persons requires therapist self-awareness, knowledge of the deaf community/culture, and understanding of culturally-syntonic therapeutic interventions. The first to exhaustively delineate the implications of the cultural model of deafness for counseling deaf people, this book is essential reading for anyone who works in an educational or counseling capacity with the deaf. This audience includes not only psychotherapists, but also vocational, guidance and residence counselors, teachers, independent living skills specialists, interpreters, and administrators of programs for the deaf.

Innovations in Deaf Studies by Annelies Kusters

Title Innovations in Deaf Studies
Author Annelies Kusters
Publisher Oxford University Press
Release 2017-04-14
Category Psychology
Total Pages 288
ISBN 0190612193
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

What does it mean to engage in Deaf Studies and who gets to define the field? What would a truly deaf-led Deaf Studies research program look like? What are the research practices of deaf scholars in Deaf Studies, and how do they relate to deaf research participants and communities? What innovations do deaf scholars deem necessary in the field of Deaf Studies? In Innovations in Deaf Studies: The Role of Deaf Scholars, volume editors Annelies Kusters, Maartje De Meulder, and Dai O'Brien and their contributing authors tackle these questions and more. Spurred by a gradual increase in the number of Deaf Studies scholars who are deaf, and by new theoretical trends in Deaf Studies, this book creates an important space for contributions from deaf researchers, to see what happens when they enter into the conversation. Innovations in Deaf Studies expertly foregrounds deaf ontologies (defined as "deaf ways of being") and how the experience of being deaf is central not only to deaf research participants' own ontologies, but also to the positionality and framework of the study as a whole. Further, this book demonstrates that the research and methodology built around those ontologies offer suggestions for new ways for the discipline to meet the challenges of the present, which includes productive and ongoing collaboration with hearing researchers. Providing fascinating perspective and insight, Kusters, De Meulder, O'Brien, and their contributors all focus on the underdeveloped strands within Deaf Studies, particularly on areas around deaf people's communities, ideologies, literature, religion, language practices, and political aspirations.

Title A Cultural History of Disability in the Long Nineteenth Century
Author Joyce L. Huff
Publisher Bloomsbury Publishing
Release 2022-03-10
Category History
Total Pages 256
ISBN 1350029092
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

The long nineteenth century-stretching from the start of the American Revolution in 1776 to the end of World War I in 1918-was a pivotal period in the history of disability for the Western world and the cultures under its imperial sway. Industrialization was a major factor in the changing landscape of disability, providing new adaptive technologies and means of access while simultaneously contributing to the creation of a mass-produced environment hostile to bodies and minds that did not adhere to emerging norms. In defining disability, medical views, which framed disabilities as problems to be solved, competed with discourses from such diverse realms as religion, entertainment, education, and literature. Disabled writers and activists generated important counternarratives, made increasingly available through the spread of print culture. An essential resource for researchers, scholars and students of history, literature, culture and education, A Cultural History of Disability in the Long Nineteenth Century includes chapters on atypical bodies, mobility impairment, chronic pain and illness, blindness, deafness, speech dysfluencies, learning difficulties, and mental health, with 34 illustrations drawn from period sources.

Understanding Deaf Culture by Dr. Paddy Ladd

Title Understanding Deaf Culture
Author Dr. Paddy Ladd
Publisher Multilingual Matters
Release 2003-02-18
Category Language Arts & Disciplines
Total Pages 526
ISBN 1847696899
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

This book presents a ‘Traveller’s Guide’ to Deaf Culture, starting from the premise that Deaf cultures have an important contribution to make to other academic disciplines, and human lives in general. Within and outside Deaf communities, there is a need for an account of the new concept of Deaf culture, which enables readers to assess its place alongside work on other minority cultures and multilingual discourses. The book aims to assess the concepts of culture, on their own terms and in their many guises and to apply these to Deaf communities. The author illustrates the pitfalls which have been created for those communities by the medical concept of ‘deafness’ and contrasts this with his new concept of “Deafhood”, a process by which every Deaf child, family and adult implicitly explains their existence in the world to themselves and each other.

Literacy and Deaf People by Brenda Jo Brueggemann

Title Literacy and Deaf People
Author Brenda Jo Brueggemann
Publisher Gallaudet University Press
Release 2004
Category Education
Total Pages 219
ISBN 9781563682711
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

This compelling collection advocates for an alternative view of deaf people's literacy, one that emphasizes recent shifts in Deaf cultural identity rather than a student's past educational context as determined by the dominant hearing society. Divided into two parts, the book opens with four chapters by leading scholars Tom Humphries, Claire Ramsey, Susan Burch, and volume editor Brenda Jo Brueggemann. These scholars use diverse disciplines to reveal how schools where deaf children are taught are the product of ideologies about teaching, about how deaf children learn, and about the relationship of ASL and English. Part Two features works by Elizabeth Engen and Trygg Engen; Tane Akamatsu and Ester Cole; Lillian Buffalo Tompkins; Sherman Wilcox and BoMee Corwin; and Kathleen M. Wood. The five chapters contributed by these noteworthy researchers offer various views on multicultural and bilingual literacy instruction for deaf students. Subjects range from a study of literacy in Norway, where Norwegian Sign Language recently became the first language of instruction for deaf pupils, to the difficulties faced by deaf immigrant and refugee children who confront institutional and cultural clashes. Other topics include the experiences of deaf adults who became bilingual in ASL and English, and the interaction of the pathological versus the cultural view of deafness. The final study examines literacy among Deaf college undergraduates as a way of determining how the current social institution of literacy translates for Deaf adults and how literacy can be extended to deaf people beyond the age of 20.

Many Ways to be Deaf by Leila Frances Monaghan

Title Many Ways to be Deaf
Author Leila Frances Monaghan
Publisher Gallaudet University Press
Release 2003
Category Language Arts & Disciplines
Total Pages 326
ISBN 9781563681356
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Table of contents