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Title The Authority of the Court and the Peril of Politics
Author Stephen Breyer
Publisher Harvard University Press
Release 2021-09-14
Category History
Total Pages 112
ISBN 0674269365
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Americans increasingly believe the Supreme Court is a political body in disguise. But Justice Stephen Breyer disagrees. Arguing that judges are committed to their oath to do impartial justice, Breyer aims to restore trust in the Court. In the absence of that trust, he warns, the Court will lose its authority, imperiling our constitutional system.

Popular Government by William Howard Taft

Title Popular Government
Author William Howard Taft
Publisher Transaction Publishers
Release 1914
Category Political Science
Total Pages 283
ISBN 1412831547
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The modern presidency is increasingly seen as in troubleby all sides of the political spectrum and by people of themost diverse political views. Understanding why this isthe case requires examining the basic principles of thepresidency itself, and there is no better place to start thanWilliam Howard Taft's Popular Government. His views onexecutive power and constitutional interpretation of thispower are not rooted in nostalgia. Instead, Taft describeshow and why the Progressive Movement marked one ofthe major turning points in American political thought. Taft wrote out of concern over the nature of the Americansystem itself. He sought to describe the foundingprinciples of the country, arguing that grasping these isessential for Americans' understanding of themselves asa people and for their daily exercise of citizenship. Theconcerns he addressed remain central today. Th at is becauseTaft's quarrels with the liberal-progressive traditionin politics have not yet completely played themselves out,either in academic life, or in the political arena. In a brilliant new introduction, Sidney Pearson arguesthat neither Roosevelt nor Wilson should be viewed asenemies of free government by any serious student ofAmerican political thought, nor should Taft be so regardedeither. The concerns Taft engages remain important for anyunderstanding of the problems that confront the Americanexperiment in popular government. Popular Governmentis a basic introduction to debate about the nature of thepresidency and the larger constitutional context in whichsuch arguments take place. Th ere is no better way to gainperspective on the debate than reading this volume. William Howard Taft served as thetwenty-third president of the United Statesfrom 1909-1913 and as Chief Justice of theSupreme Court from 1921-1930. He is theonly person to have held the highest officein two of the three branches of Americangovernment. He wrote numerous booksincluding Our Chief Magistrate andHis Powers, The Anti-Trust Act and theSupreme Court, and The Covenanter: AnAmerican Exposition of the Covenant of the League of Nations. Sidney A. Pearson, Jr. is professor emeritus of political scienceat Radford University. He is also the series editor of Library ofLiberal Thought at Transaction Publishers.

Popular Government by William Howard Taft

Title Popular Government
Author William Howard Taft
Publisher Routledge
Release 2017-07-12
Category Political Science
Total Pages 360
ISBN 1351497979
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The modern presidency is increasingly seen as in trouble by all sides of the political spectrum and by people of the most diverse political views. Understanding why this is the case requires examining the basic principles of the presidency itself, and there is no better place to start than William Howard Taft's Popular Government. His views on executive power and constitutional interpretation of this power are not rooted in nostalgia. Instead, Taft describes how and why the Progressive Movement marked one of the major turning points in American political thought. Taft wrote out of concern over the nature of the American system itself. He sought to describe the founding principles of the country, arguing that grasping these is essential for Americans' understanding of themselves as a people and for their daily exercise of citizenship. The concerns he addressed remain central today. Th at is because Taft's quarrels with the liberal-progressive tradition in politics have not yet completely played themselves out, either in academic life, or in the political arena. In a brilliant new introduction, Sidney Pearson argues that neither Roosevelt nor Wilson should be viewed as enemies of free government by any serious student of American political thought, nor should Taft be so regarded either. The concerns Taft engages remain important for any understanding of the problems that confront the American experiment in popular government. Popular Government is a basic introduction to debate about the nature of the presidency and the larger constitutional context in which such arguments take place. Th ere is no better way to gain perspective on the debate than reading this volume.

Between Peril and Promise by J. Martin Rochester

Title Between Peril and Promise
Author J. Martin Rochester
Publisher CQ Press
Release 2006-01-13
Category Political Science
Total Pages 278
ISBN
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

States guard their sovereignty, resisting the idea of 2global governance,3 especially in the face of intensifying globalization that has fostered ever more economic and social interdependence. Despite sovereign concerns, international law is far more than a utopian ideal, Rochester argues; rather, it is a very real part of world affairs that is shaped by international politics and, in turn, shapes relations between states. Rochester explores the role of international law in international affairs, moving beyond a purely legal approach to the topic. He begins with the substantive rules of international law and then examines its development and operation in five major sectorshuman rights; war and peace; the international economy; the law of the sea, airspace, and outer space; and international environment lawall through the lens of international relations theory. Supported by the latest scholarly research and supplemented with instructive case studies, illustrative photos and cartoons, and meaningful discussion questions, this book seeks to spark interest in a subject with a rich history of great contemporary importance and with increasing relevance to our lives.

The Unrecognised Peril by S Utham Kumar Jamadhagni

Title The Unrecognised Peril
Author S Utham Kumar Jamadhagni
Publisher Vij Books India Pvt Ltd
Release 2014-03-03
Category Political Science
Total Pages 282
ISBN 9382652507
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Acknowledging the importance of non traditional security in the wider debate, this book looks at one significant aspect namely, environmental security. The book discusses different issues of theoretical and practical import through various chapters that deal with the general need for study on human and environmental security, its degradation due to a variety of factors like climate change, war, pollution and resource utilisation. Moving from a regional South Asian focus the book narrows down to specific cases within India and the region at large to highlight the widespread effect anthropogenic factors have had on environmental security. A diverse set of articles from many authors has meant a comprehensive perspective on a vital global and national concern.

Title Courts and Congress
Author Quirk
Publisher Transaction Publishers
Release 2010-01-01
Category Political Science
Total Pages 312
ISBN 1412811449
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Its often said, confirmed by survey data, that the American people are losing confidence in their government. But the problem may be the reverse-the government has lost confidence in the people. Increasingly the power to make decisions in our democracy has been shifted from Congress to the court system, forcing non-elected officials to make decisions that affect the lives of Americans. In a society which is based on the democratic elections of its officials, this is clearly backwards. Quirk maintains that what he calls the Happy Convention, an informal and unwritten rearrangement of "passing the buck" of government powers, is done to avoid blame and approval ratings becoming lower for a particular person or party. For example, the Happy Convention assigns the power to declare and make war to the president. Congress and the court play a supporting role-Congress, when requested, gives the president a blank check to use force-the Court throws out any challenges to the legality of the war. Everyone wins if the war avoids disaster. If it turns out badly, the president is held accountable. His ratings fall, reelection is out of the question, congressmen say he lied to them; his party is likely to lose the next election. In this way, Quirk reminds us that the Happy Convention is not what the Founders intended for us. For democracy to work properly, the American people have to know what options they have. Courts and Congress assigns vast power, even the power to decide presidential elections-to the Imperial Court. The Founders, if you brought them back today would at least recognize the Congress and the president. They would be astounded to read that the courts are in actual peril. They would even less likely understand that the courts are on the ballot. The founders would not appreciate subjecting the judiciary to such partisan political rule; nor claims William Quirk, should it be.

The Perils of Identity by Caroline Dick

Title The Perils of Identity
Author Caroline Dick
Publisher UBC Press
Release 2011-11-15
Category Social Science
Total Pages 260
ISBN 0774820659
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Many liberal theorists consider group identity claims a necessary condition of equality in Canada, but do these claims do more harm than good? To answer this question, Caroline Dick examines the identity-driven theories of Charles Taylor, Will Kymlicka, and Avigail Eisenberg in the context of Sawridge Band v. Canada, a case that sets a First Nation's right to self-determination against Indigenous women's right to equality. The concept of identity itself is not the problem, Dick argues, but rather the way in which prevailing conceptions of identity and group rights obscure intragroup differences. Her proposal for a new politics of intragroup difference has the power to transform rights discourse in Canada.