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The Messiah in the Old Testament by Walter C. Kaiser

Title The Messiah in the Old Testament
Author Walter C. Kaiser
Publisher Zondervan
Release 1995
Category Religion
Total Pages 256
ISBN 031020030X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This detailed chronological study by a noted scholar describes the unfolding Old Testament concept of Messiah.

Title A Catholic Introduction to the Bible The Old Testament
Author John Bergsma
Publisher Ignatius Press
Release
Category Religion
Total Pages 1060
ISBN 1642290483
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Although many Catholics are familiar with the four Gospels and other writings of the New Testament, for most, reading the Old Testament is like walking into a foreign land. Who wrote these forty-six books? When were they written? Why were they written? What are we to make of their laws, stories, histories, and prophecies? Should the Old Testament be read by itself or in light of the New Testament? John Bergsma and Brant Pitre offer readable in-depth answers to these questions as they introduce each book of the Old Testament. They not only examine the literature from a historical and cultural perspective but also interpret it theologically, drawing on the New Testament and the faith of the Catholic Church. Unique among introductions, this volume places the Old Testament in its liturgical context, showing how its passages are employed in the current Lectionary used at Mass. Accessible to nonexperts, this thorough and up-to-date introduction to the Old Testament can serve as an idea textbook for biblical studies. Its unique approach, along with its maps, illustrations, and other reference materials, makes it a valuable resource for seminarians, priests, Scripture scholars, theologians, and catechists, as well as anyone seeking a deeper understanding of the Bible.

Title The Old Testament in the New An Introduction
Author Steve Moyise
Publisher Bloomsbury Publishing
Release 2015-09-24
Category Religion
Total Pages 208
ISBN 0567656357
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Steve Moyise provides an accessible and well-informed introduction to the Old Testament in the New Testament. Tried and tested in previous editions, it explores the basic issues and offers summaries of the uses of the Old Testament in the Gospels and Acts, in Paul and Hebrews, James, and Revelation. Issues of quotation, allusion and echo are fully explored and placed sensitively in the context of the differing approaches to the interpretation of Old Testament texts. Readers are informed of contemporary debates that have arisen from literary criticism, such as the questions of intertextuality and the uses of allegory. Also discussed are the uses of the Bible in the first century. For the second edition two entirely new chapters on 'Jesus and Scripture' and 'James and 1-3 John' have been added, as well as full revisions to the text where necessary to take account of changes and developments in scholarship. Each chapter includes a summary-conclusion, and extensive and detailed suggestions for further reading. This is an ideal textbook for undergraduate students.

Title Global Perspectives on the Old Testament
Author Mark Roncace
Publisher Pearson Higher Ed
Release 2013-07-26
Category Religion
Total Pages 336
ISBN 0205933823
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A revolutionary title for and by the global community This exciting first edition of Global Perspectives on the Old Testament, edited by Mark Roncace and Joseph Weaver, collects writings from a variety of geographic, social, cultural, political, economic, and religious settings. The book features 28 chapters, each comprised of four short, accessible essays on a specific biblical text. This design creates a focused, dynamic conversation of perspectives, which will in turn prompt engaging conversations in the classroom. Students will learn about themselves and their own particular context as they explore the ideas and contexts of other biblical interpreters from around the globe. In addition to presenting truly fresh interpretations of the Old Testament—this is no predictable compendium of scholarly essays—the book features discussion questions at the end of each chapter, as well as many additional questions in the Instructor’s Resource Manual. MySearchLab is a part of the Roncace/Weaver program. Research and writing tools, including access to academic journals, help students explore the Old Testament in even greater depth. To provide students with flexibility, students can download the eText to a tablet using the free Pearson eText app. NOTE: MySearchLab does not come automatically packaged with this text. To purchase the text with MySearchLab, order the package ISBN: 0205961029 / 9780205961023 Global Perspectives on the Old Testament Plus MySearchLab with eText --Access Card Package Package consists of : 0205239927 / 9780205239924 MySearchLab with Pearson eText -- Valuepack Access Card 0205909213 / 9780205909216 Global Perspectives on the Old Testament

Title Finding Jesus in the Old Testament
Author David Limbaugh
Publisher Simon and Schuster
Release 2015-11-09
Category Religion
Total Pages 420
ISBN 1621574504
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A New York Times Bestseller! In Finding Jesus in the Old Testament, David Limbaugh unlocks the mysteries of the Old Testament and reveals hints of Jesus Christ's arrival through all thirty-nine Old Testament books. The key to the secrets of the Old Testament, Limbaugh argues, is the crucial New Testament encounter between the risen Jesus and two travelers on the road to Emmaus. With that key, and with Limbaugh as a deft guide, readers of Finding Jesus in the Old Testament will come to a startling new understanding of the Old Testament as a clear and powerful heralding of Jesus Christ's arrival. Limbaugh takes readers on a revealing journey from Genesis through Malachi, demonstrating that a consistent message courses through every one of the Old Testament's thirty-nine books: the power, wonder, and everlasting love of Jesus Christ. Previously published under the title The Emmaus Code.

Understand the Old Testament by David Holsted

Title Understand the Old Testament
Author David Holsted
Publisher Christian Faith Publishing, Inc.
Release 2018-02-16
Category Religion
Total Pages 658
ISBN 164079767X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A full 75 percent of the Bible is the Old Testament. If one of your kids, or your coworkers, or your friends were to ask you about the Old Testament, could you talk knowledgably about it? When you pastor says that your church believes in the Old Testament because the whole Bible is about Jesus, can you even imagine what he's talking about? In my experience, Christians often know stories from the Old Testament, or maybe have memorized verses from it, but very few would say that they understand it. That's where I stood not long ago, so I set out to do something about it. Frankly, without help, the Old Testament can be difficult to read, let alone understand. But with a little guidance, you can not only understand it, you can appreciate how it harmonizes with the New Testament and you can see how it is so foundational to your faith. I put together this book as I earnestly studied my way through the Old Testament. My hope is that I have taken hundreds of hours of reading and work, and summarized it into a book that can be used by Christians who just don't have hundreds of hours to invest. This book combines the best of what I've read and studied about the Old Testament. • It is part book-read it through, or select areas of interest from the summaries. • It is part Bible study guide-use the summaries to study or lead a Bible study group. • It is part commentary-use it to complement your Old Testament reading. The Old Testament is the story that Jesus completes, and the promise that Jesus fulfills. Are you willing to invest about an hour per week for a year in order to see how this is true? • Learn the name, nature, attributes, and character of God. • Learn biblical principles, patterns, and promises. • Learn about Hebrew culture, language, and history in the context of world history. • Learn of the prophecies of hope through the Messiah. • Learn how the Old Testament testifies to Jesus throughout! Share this adventure with me! Take the first step! Start down the path! You will find it one of the most fulfilling things you've ever done!

Title Dictionary of the Old Testament Historical Books
Author Bill T. Arnold
Publisher InterVarsity Press
Release 2011-10-26
Category Religion
Total Pages 1759
ISBN 9780830869466
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Edited by Bill T. Arnold and Hugh G. M. Williamson, the Dictionary of the Old Testament: Historical Books is the second volume in IVP's Old Testament dictionary series. This volume picks up where the Dictionary of the Old Testament: Pentateuch left off--with Joshua and Israel poised to enter the land--and carries us through the postexilic period. Following in the tradition of the four award-winning IVP dictionaries focused on the New Testament, this encyclopedic work is characterized by in-depth articles focused on key topics, many of them written by noted experts. The history of Israel forms the skeletal structure of the Old Testament. Understanding this history and the biblical books that trace it is essential to comprehending the Bible. The Dictionary of the Old Testament: Historical Books is the only reference book focused exclusively on these biblical books and the history of Israel. The dictionary presents articles on numerous historical topics as well as major articles focused on the books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings, Chronicles, Ezra and Nehemiah. Other articles focus on the Deuteronomistic History as well as the Chronicler's History, the narrative art of Israel's historians, innerbiblical exegesis, text and textual criticism, and the emergence of these books as canonical. One feature is a series of eight consecutive articles on the periods of Israel's history from the settlement to postexilic period, which form a condensed history of Israel within the DOTHB. Syro-Palestinian archaeology is surveyed in one article, while significant archaeological sites receive focused treatment, usually under the names of biblical cities and towns such as Jerusalem and Samaria, Shiloh and Shechem, Dan and Beersheba. Other articles delve into the histories and cultures of the great neighboring empires--Egypt, Assyria, Babylonia and Persia--as well as lesser peoples, such as the Ammonites, Edomites, Moabites, Philistines and Phoenicians. In addition there are articles on architecture, Solomon's temple, agriculture and animal husbandry, roads and highways, trade and travel, and water and water systems. The languages of Hebrew and Aramaic, as well as linguistics, each receive careful treatment, as well as the role of scribes and their schools, and writing and literacy in ancient Israel and its environs. The DOTHB also canvases the full range of relevant extrabiblical written evidence, with five articles focused on the various non-Israelite written sources as well as articles on Hebrew inscriptions and ancient Near Eastern iconography. Articles on interpretive methods, on hermeneutics and on preaching the Historical Books will assist students and communicators in understanding how this biblical literature has been studied and interpreted, and its proper use in preaching. In the same vein, theological topics such as God, prayer, faith, forgiveness and righteousness receive separate treatment. The history of Israel has long been contested territory, but never more so than today. Much like the quest of the historical Jesus, a quest of the historical Israel is underway. At the heart of the quest to understand the history of Israel and the Old Testament's Historical Books is the struggle to come to terms with the conventions of ancient historiography. How did these writers conceive of their task and to whom were they writing? Clearly the Old Testament historians did not go about their task as we would today. The divine word was incarnated in ancient culture. Rather than being a dictionary of quick answers and easy resolutions readily provided, the DOTHB seeks to set out the evidence and arguments, allowing a range of informed opinion to enrich the conversation. In this way it is hoped that the DOTHB will not only inform its readers, but draw them into the debate and equip them to examine the evidence for themselves.

Title De demonising the Old Testament
Author Judit M. Blair
Publisher Mohr Siebeck
Release 2009
Category Religion
Total Pages 266
ISBN 9783161501319
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The subject of demons and demonology has fascinated scholars and non-scholars, ancient and modern alike; it is not surprising that much work has been done on the topic by biblical scholars too. Chapter 1 places the present study within the existing scholarship showing that the early works on 'OT demonology' were influenced by comparative religion, anthropology, and an increasing interest in Mesopotamian and Canaanite parallels as well as a concern to seek and find vestiges of ancient religious beliefs in the Old Testament. The consensus of early 20th century scholars regarding what constitutes a 'demon' in the Old Testament has not been challenged by modern scholarship. Chapter 2 shows that biblical scholars still commonly turn to the ancient Near Eastern religions and cultures to explain difficult passages in the Hebrew Bible, to find parallels or the 'original' of difficult terms and concepts. Since it is generally accepted without challenge that azazel, lilith, deber, qeteb and reshef are the personal names of 'demons' appearing in the Hebrew Bible, the necessity arises to return to the texts in order to examine each term in its context. The present study seeks to answer the question whether these five terms are names of 'demons' in the Hebrew texts as we have them today. To accomplish its goal the present study will provide an exegesis based on Close Reading of all the relevant biblical passages in which the terms azazel (chapter 3), lilith (chapter 4), deber (chapter 5), qeteb (chapter 6), and reshef (chapter 7) appear. Attention is paid to the linguistic, semantic, and structural levels of the texts. The emphasis is on a close examination of the immediate context in order to determine the function (and if possible the meaning) of each term. The reading focuses on determining how the various signals within the text can guide towards meaning, noting how the (implied) poet/author uses the various poetical/rhetorical devices, especially personification, but also parallelism, similes, irony, and mythological elements. The present study shows that contrary to former and current scholarship there is nothing in the texts to support the view that azazel, lilith, deber, qeteb and reshef are the names of 'demons'. Azazel appears as the personification of the forces of chaos that threaten the order of creation; his role is to stand in contrast to Yahweh. The context requires that lilith is regarded as a bird, a night bird being the most plausible explanation of the term. Deber, qeteb and reshef are personifications of destructive forces and appear as agents of Yahweh, members of his 'Angels of Evil' who bring punishment (death) on the people of Israel for disobedience. There is no evidence to suggest that there are mythological figures behind azazel, lilith or the personifications of deber and qeteb. In case of reshef there is a possible connection to the Semitic deity Reshef. However, the mythological motifs are used merely as a poetic device.

From Prophecy to Testament by Craig A. Evans

Title From Prophecy to Testament
Author Craig A. Evans
Publisher Hendrickson Pub
Release 2004
Category Religion
Total Pages 280
ISBN
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The theology of the New Testament is indebted to, and is a reflection of, major Old Testament themes, images, and language, because the New Testament authors wrote in the context of the Old Testament and the rich Jewish tradition of the study and interpretation of scripture. A group of ancient Jewish writers provided the Christian church with its Old Testament Greek text (the Septuagint) and provided Aramaic translations (the Targums) for some of the writers of the New Testament. This group also produced many works that, whether intentionally or not, offered interpretations, expansions, and explanations of difficult or obscure Old Testament passages that influenced the New Testament authors. From Prophecy to Testament opens with a basic overview of past work on the development of New Testament theology, and then offers a superb collection of essays exploring the numerous ways in which New Testament writers were formed and informed by the biblical and extrabiblical literature of the Israelite people of the Second-Temple period. - Publisher.

Matthew s Bible by M. J. J. Menken

Title Matthew s Bible
Author M. J. J. Menken
Publisher Peeters Publishers
Release 2004
Category Religion
Total Pages 344
ISBN 9789042914193
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

What type of Old Testament text did Matthew use as editor of his Gospel? On the one hand, the editorially inserted fulfilment quotations with their peculiar textual form may be expected to represent Matthew's biblical text. On the other hand, the remaining OT quotations are mainly Septuagintal, and it is often assumed that Matthew reinforced the Septuagintal character of the quotations which he found in his sources. In the first part of this study, the fulfilment quotations are examined. Their textual form is best explained as a Septuagint text that was revised to make it better agree with the Hebrew and to improve the quality of its Greek; the evangelist took these quotations from a continuous text. In the second part, Matthew's remaining OT quotations are investigated. If Matthew borrows quotations from his sources, he does not adjust them to the LXX but he simply copies them or edits them in his usual way; if he inserts quotations into his sources, he makes use of his revised Septuagint. On the whole, this revised Septuagint seems to have been "Matthew's Bible".