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Title Red River
Author
Publisher Viz
Release 2009-07-14
Category Comics & Graphic Novels
Total Pages 200
ISBN 9781421522524
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

When Yuri, a modern-day teenager, travels back in time to the ancient Hittite Empire, Prince Kail, a young sorcerer, has the power to send her back during the season of the North Star, but the evil Queen Nakia's plans keep getting in the way.

Title The Red River in Southwestern History
Author Carl Newton Tyson
Publisher University of Oklahoma Press
Release 2015-07-15
Category History
Total Pages 238
ISBN 0806153822
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In The Red River in Southwestern History, Carl Newton Tyson traces the river’s history from the time of early Spanish and French explorers to the present day, leading his readers to a new appreciation of the river and the region. From the Staked Plains of the Texas Panhandle the river flows down to buffalo and prairie dog country and through the Cross Timbers. It continues eastward to the Great Bend and through the cypresses of Louisiana’s bayou country, joining the Mississippi River south of Natchez. Whereas the Red River was a source of water to the Spaniards as they searched for gold, at Natchitoches, French trader Louis Juchereau de St. Denis traded with the Caddo Indians. Conflicts soon developed between French traders and Spaniards in Texas as they competed for land along the Red. Years later, the Red River featured again as part of the settlement in the 1819 Adams-Onís Treaty, negotiated by Spanish minister Luis de Onís y Gonzales and U.S. secretary of state John Quincy Adams, which finally brought to an end the western boundary disputes between Spain and the United States lingering since the 1803 Louisiana Purchase. In 1852 Randolph Marcy discovered the source of the Red River—a mountain rivulet cutting a deep canyon through the Staked Plains. Marcy’s testimony in the Greer County border dispute between Oklahoma and Texas was key to the U.S. Supreme Court decision favoring Oklahoma. In the decades between 1930 and 1970, dams were built along the Red by the U.S. Corps of Engineers to control floods, generate electricity, and create lakes for recreation along the Oklahoma-Texas border.

The Yankee Invasion of Texas by Stephen A. Townsend

Title The Yankee Invasion of Texas
Author Stephen A. Townsend
Publisher Texas A&M University Press
Release 2006-01-27
Category History
Total Pages 194
ISBN 1585444871
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In 1863 the Union capture of Texas was viewed as crucial to the strategy to deny the Confederacy the territory west of the Mississippi and thus to break the back of Southern military force. Overland, Texas supplied Louisiana and points east with needed goods; by way of Mexico, Texas offered a detour around the blockade of Southern ports and thus an economic link to England and France. But Union forces had no good base from which to interdict either part of the Texas trade. Their efforts were characterized by short, unsuccessful forays, primarily in East and South Texas. One of these, which left New Orleans on October 26, 1863, and was known as the Rio Grande Expedition, forms the centerpiece of this book. Stephen A. Townsend carefully traces the actions—and inaction—of the Union forces from the capture of Brownsville by troops under Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks, through the advance up the coast with the help of Union Loyalists, until General Ulysses S. Grant ordered the abandonment of all of Texas except Brownsville in March 1864. Townsend analyzes the effects of the campaign on the local populace, the morale and good order of the two armies involved, U.S. diplomatic relations with France, the Texas cotton trade, and postwar politics in the state. He thoughtfully assesses the benefits and losses to the Northern war effort of this only sustained occupation of Texas. No understanding of the Civil War west of the Mississippi—or its place in the Union strategy for the Deep South—will be complete without this informative study.

Title The Red River Campaign of 1864 and the Loss by the Confederacy of the Civil War
Author Michael J. Forsyth
Publisher McFarland
Release 2015-07-11
Category History
Total Pages 192
ISBN 1476615721
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The Union Army’s Red River Campaign began on March 12, 1864, with a two-pronged attack aimed at gaining control of Shreveport, Louisiana. It lasted until May 22, 1864, when, after suffering significant casualties, the Union army retreated to Simmesport, Louisiana. The campaign was an attempt to prevent Confederate alliance with the French in Mexico, deny supplies to Confederate forces, and secure vast quantities of Louisiana and Texas cotton for Northern mills. With this examination of Confederate leadership and how it affected the Red River Campaign, the author argues against the standard assumption that the campaign had no major effect on the outcome of the war. In fact, the South had—and lost—an excellent opportunity to inflict a decisive defeat that might have changed the course of history. With this campaign as an ideal example, the politics of military decision-making in general are also analyzed.

Title The 47th Indiana Volunteer Infantry
Author David Williamson
Publisher McFarland
Release 2014-01-10
Category History
Total Pages 448
ISBN 0786488875
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Organized at Indianapolis in December 1861, the 47th Indiana Volunteer Infantry’s Civil War service spanned the Mississippi Valley and the Gulf South. From Louisville to New Orleans and on to Mobile, General James R. Slack and the 47th Indiana took the war to the inland waterways and southern bayous, fighting in many of the Civil War’s most famous campaigns, including Vicksburg, Red River and Mobile. This chronicle of the 47th Indiana follows the regiment’s odyssey through the words of its officers and men. Sources include Chaplain Samuel Sawyer’s account of their exploits in the Indianapolis Daily Journal, soldiers’ accounts in Indiana newspapers, stories of war and intrigue from newspapermen of the “Bohemian Brigade,” and General Slack’s own story in letters to his wife, Ann, including his postwar command on the Rio Grande. Numerous photographs, previously unpublished battle and area maps, and a full regimental roster complete this detailed account.

The Red River Campaign and Its Toll by Henry O. Robertson

Title The Red River Campaign and Its Toll
Author Henry O. Robertson
Publisher McFarland
Release 2016-04-27
Category History
Total Pages 220
ISBN 147662447X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The Red River Campaign in the spring of 1864 was one of the most destructive of the Civil War. The agricultural wealth of the Red River Valley tempted Union General Nathaniel P. Banks to invade with 30,000 troops in an attempt to seize control of the river and confiscate as much cotton as possible from local plantations. After three months of chaos, during which the countryside was destroyed and many slaves freed themselves, Banks was defeated by a smaller Confederate force under General Richard Taylor. This book takes a fresh look at the fierce battles at Mansfield and Pleasant Hill, the Union army’s escape from Monett’s Ferry and the burning of Alexandria, and explains the causes and consequences of the war in Central Louisiana.

Title Walker s Texas Division C S A
Author Richard Lowe
Publisher LSU Press
Release 2006-04-01
Category History
Total Pages 356
ISBN 0807131539
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Colorfully known as the "Greyhound Division" for its lean and speedy marches across thousands of miles in three states, Major General John G. Walker's infantry division in the Confederate army was the largest body of Texans -- about 12,000 men at its formation -- to serve in the American Civil War. From its creation in 1862 until its disbandment at the war's end, Walker's unit remained, uniquely for either side in the conflict, a stable group of soldiers from a single state. Richard Lowe's compelling saga shows how this collection of farm boys, store clerks, carpenters, and lawyers became the trans-Mississippi's most potent Confederate fighting unit, from the vain attack at Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, in 1863 during Grant's Vicksburg Campaign to stellar performances at the battles of Mansfield, Pleasant Hill, and Jenkins' Ferry that helped repel Nathaniel P. Banks's Red River Campaign of 1864. Lowe's skillful blending of narrative drive and demographic profiling represents an innovative history of the period that is sure to set a new benchmark.

Through the Howling Wilderness by Gary D. Joiner

Title Through the Howling Wilderness
Author Gary D. Joiner
Publisher Univ. of Tennessee Press
Release 2006
Category History
Total Pages 305
ISBN 9781572335448
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"The efforts of the Confederates to defend northern Louisiana - building an army and preparing to trap the Union naval forces before the campaign began - have been all but lost in the literature of the Civil War." "Replete with in-depth coverage on the geography of the region, the Congressional hearings after the Campaign, and the Confederate defenses in the Red River Valley, Through the Howling Wilderness will appeal to Civil War historians and buffs alike."--Jacket.

Title Confederate Generals in the Trans Mississippi
Author Lawrence Lee Hewitt
Publisher Univ. of Tennessee Press
Release 2015-05-29
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 309
ISBN 1621900894
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In contrast to Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia, the armies and events of the Civil War’s Trans-Mississippi Theater have received scant historical attention, to the detriment of our understanding not only of individuals and events west of the Mississippi River, but also to the east of it. In Confederate Generals in the Trans-Mississippi, Volume 2, noted Civil War historians offer fresh scholarship on eight generals who made names for themselves in the region, providing intriguing insight into important wartime issues in the Trans-Mississippi and beyond. Contrary to popular belief, the Trans-Mississippi did not serve as a dumping ground for generals who had failed in Virginia. Instead, the majority of generals who served in the region were homegrown and faced challenges unknown to their counterparts in the East—expansive territory, few men, and limited transportation for the meager supplies available. Superior Union numbers in the West, however, did not guarantee Union victory. As these essays show, southern generals often beat themselves because of personal failings or an inability to work together. Sterling Price and Ben McCulloch refused to cooperate, Henry Sibley combined alcoholism with cowardice, and the able French-born Prince de Polignac faced language barriers. The war ended before Joseph Brent, a visionary regarding tank warfare, could make his name as a brigadier, and “Prince John” Magruder’s achievements in Texas remain overshadowed by his earlier career in Virginia. The Cajun Alfred Mouton, a superior leader, died on a battlefield in his native Louisiana, while Mosby Parsons survived the war only to be murdered by Mexican cavalry. While some of these generals breathed life into the Confederacy, others hastened its downfall. By chronicling the lives and careers of these eight generals, this welcome volume integrates the Trans-Mississippi more fully with the Western Theater and illuminates critical issues vital to understanding the South’s ultimate defeat. Lawrence Lee Hewitt is professor of history emeritus at Southeastern Louisiana University. He is the author of Port Hudson: Confederate Bastion on the Mississippi and coeditor of six anthologies dealing with America’s Civil War. Thomas E. Schott worked as a historian for the Department of Defense. He is the author of Alexander H. Stephens of Georgia: A Biography, winner of the Jefferson Davis Award, and coeditor with Lawrence Hewitt of Lee and His Generals: Essays in Honor of T. Harry Williams.

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