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Title The Collapse of Yugoslavia 1991 1999
Author Alastair Finlan
Publisher Bloomsbury Publishing
Release 2014-06-06
Category History
Total Pages 96
ISBN 1472810279
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In 1991, an ethnically diverse region that had enjoyed decades of peaceful coexistence descended into bitter hatred and chaos, almost overnight. Communities fractured along lines of ethnic and religious affiliation and the ensuing fighting was deeply personal, resulting in brutality, rape and torture, and ultimately the deaths of thousands of people. This book examines the internal upheavals of the former Yugoslavia and their international implications, including the failure of the Vance-Owen plan; the first use of NATO in a combat role and in peace enforcement; and the war in Kosovo, unsanctioned by the UN but prosecuted by NATO forces to prevent the ethnic cleansing of the region.

Title The Collapse of Yugoslavia 1991 1999
Author Alastair Finlan
Publisher
Release 2004
Category Yugoslavia
Total Pages 75
ISBN 9781472895219
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"In 1991, an ethnically diverse region that had enjoyed decades of peaceful coexistence descended into bitter hatred and chaos, almost overnight. Communities fractured along lines of ethnic and religious affiliation and the ensuing fighting was deeply personal, resulting in brutality, rape and torture, and ultimately the deaths of thousands of people. This book examines the internal upheavals of the former Yugoslavia and their international implications, including the failure of the Vance-Owen plan; the first use of NATO in a combat role and in peace enforcement; and the war in Kosovo, unsanctioned by the UN but prosecuted by NATO forces to prevent the ethnic cleansing of the region."--Bloomsbury Publishing.

Empire of Democracy by Simon Reid-Henry

Title Empire of Democracy
Author Simon Reid-Henry
Publisher Simon & Schuster
Release 2019-06-25
Category Political Science
Total Pages 880
ISBN 1451684967
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The first panoramic history of the Western world from the 1970s to the present day, Empire of Democracy is the story for those asking how we got to where we are. Half a century ago, at the height of the Cold War and amidst a world economic crisis, the Western democracies were forced to undergo a profound transformation. Against what some saw as a full-scale “crisis of democracy”— with race riots, anti-Vietnam marches and a wave of worker discontent sowing crisis from one nation to the next— a new political-economic order was devised and the postwar social contract was torn up and written anew. In this epic narrative of the events that have shaped our own times, Simon Reid-Henry shows how liberal democracy, and western history with it, was profoundly reimagined when the postwar Golden Age ended. As the institutions of liberal rule were reinvented, a new generation of politicians emerged: Thatcher, Reagan, Mitterrand, Kohl. The late twentieth century heyday they oversaw carried the Western democracies triumphantly to victory in the Cold War and into the economic boom of the 1990s. But equally it led them into the fiasco of Iraq, to the high drama of the financial crisis in 2007/8, and ultimately to the anti-liberal surge of our own times. The present crisis of liberalism enjoins us to revisit these as yet unscripted decades. The era we have all been living through is closing out, democracy is turning on its axis once again. As this panoramic history poignantly reminds us, the choices we make going forward require us first to come to terms with where we have been.

Title The Roots and Consequences of 20th Century Warfare Conflicts that Shaped the Modern World
Author Spencer C. Tucker
Publisher ABC-CLIO
Release 2016-09-06
Category History
Total Pages 545
ISBN 1610698029
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This unique reference book introduces readers to the causes and effects of the 20th century's most significant conflicts—and explains how the impact of these conflicts still resonates today. • Supplies introductory essays that provide detailed overviews of each conflict, as well as an in-depth look at the causes and consequences of these critical 20th-century events • Enables students to improve their critical thinking by helping them to identify, analyze, and evaluate the relationships among multiple historical causes and effects • Offers clear, accessible coverage of key 20th-century conflicts, such as the Irish Civil War, the Spanish Civil War, African Independence Wars, the Iran-Iraq War, and others

The Yugoslav Wars of the 1990s by Catherine Baker

Title The Yugoslav Wars of the 1990s
Author Catherine Baker
Publisher Macmillan International Higher Education
Release 2015-07-31
Category History
Total Pages 192
ISBN 113739899X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Catherine Baker offers an up-to-date, balanced and concise introductory account of the Yugoslav wars of the 1990s and their aftermath. The volume incorporates the latest research, showing how the state of the field has evolved and guides students through the existing literature, topics and debates.

Balkan Genocides by Paul Mojzes

Title Balkan Genocides
Author Paul Mojzes
Publisher Rowman & Littlefield
Release 2011
Category History
Total Pages 299
ISBN 1442206632
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Details the history of the three major waves of genocide and ethnic cleansing in the Balkan peninsula and Yugoslavia during the twentieth century.

Title Modern Genocide The Definitive Resource and Document Collection 4 volumes
Author Paul R. Bartrop
Publisher ABC-CLIO
Release 2014-12-17
Category Political Science
Total Pages 2270
ISBN 1610693647
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This massive, four-volume work provides students with a close examination of 10 modern genocides enhanced by documents and introductions that provide additional historical and contemporary context for learning about and understanding these tragic events. • Provides a comprehensive examination of 10 modern genocides together in a single reference work, written by experts to be easily readable by advanced high school, undergraduate, and graduate students • Includes a collection of documents with each genocide section that also contains appropriate introductions to set the historical and contemporary context • Addresses not only the sobering reality of these different modern genocides but the pervasive, long-term consequences and impact on the communities affected by them • Supplies Analyze sections that allow for critical thinking while providing readers with insight into some of the most controversial and significant issues involving genocide • Serves as a gateway to further explorations regarding questions on genocide prevention, intervention, and the delivery of humanitarian aid

A History of the Laws of War Volume 1 by Alexander Gillespie

Title A History of the Laws of War Volume 1
Author Alexander Gillespie
Publisher Bloomsbury Publishing
Release 2011-09-06
Category Law
Total Pages 278
ISBN 1847318614
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This unique new work of reference traces the origins of the modern laws of warfare from the earliest times to the present day. Relying on written records from as far back as 2400 BCE, and using sources ranging from the Bible to Security Council Resolutions, the author pieces together the history of a subject which is almost as old as civilisation itself. The author shows that as long as humanity has been waging wars it has also been trying to find ways of legitimising different forms of combatants and regulating the treatment of captives. This first book on warfare deals with the broad question of whether the patterns of dealing with combatants and captives have changed over the last 5,000 years, and if so, how? In terms of context, the first part of the book is about combatants and those who can 'lawfully' take part in combat. In many regards, this part of the first volume is a series of 'less than ideal' pathways. This is because in an ideal world there would be no combatants because there would be no fighting. Yet as a species we do not live in such a place or even anywhere near it, either historically or in contemporary times. This being so, a second-best alternative has been to attempt to control the size of military forces and, therefore, the bloodshed. This is also not the case by which humanity has worked over the previous centuries. Rather, the clear assumption for thousands of years has been that authorities are allowed to build the size of their armed forces as large as they wish. The restraints that have been applied are in terms of the quality and methods by which combatants are taken. The considerations pertain to questions of biology such as age and sex, geographical considerations such as nationality, and the multiple nuances of informal or formal combatants. These questions have also overlapped with ones of compulsion and whether citizens within a country can be compelled to fight without their consent. Accordingly, for the previous 3,000 years, the question has not been whether there should be a limit on the number of soldiers, but rather who is or is not a lawful combatant. It has rarely been a question of numbers. It has been, and remains, one of type. The second part of this book is about people, typically combatants, captured in battle. It is about what happens to their status as prisoners, about the possibilities of torture, assistance if they are wounded and what happens to their remains should they be killed and their bodies fall into enemy hands. The theme that ties all of these considerations together is that all of the acts befall those who are, to one degree or another, captives of their enemies. As such, they are no longer masters of their own fate. As a work of reference this first volume, as part of a set of three, is unrivalled, and will be of immense benefit to scholars and practitioners researching and advising on the laws of warfare. It also tells a story which throws fascinating new light on the history of international law and on the history of warfare itself.

When Doctors Kill by Joshua A. Perper

Title When Doctors Kill
Author Joshua A. Perper
Publisher Springer Science & Business Media
Release 2010-06-14
Category Medical
Total Pages 253
ISBN 9781441913692
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

It would come as no surprise that many readers may be shocked and intrigued by the title of our book. Some (especially our medical colleagues) may wonder why it is even worthwhile to raise the issue of killing by doctors. Killing is clearly an- thetical to the Art and Science of Medicine, which is geared toward easing pain and suffering and to saving lives rather than smothering them. Doctors should be a source of comfort rather than a cause for alarm. Nevertheless, although they often don’t want to admit it, doctors are people too. Physicians have the same genetic library of both endearing qualities and character defects as the rest of us but their vocation places them in a position to intimately interject themselves into the lives of other people. In most cases, fortunately, the positive traits are dominant and doctors do more good than harm. While physicists and mathematicians paved the road to the stars and deciphered the mysteries of the atom, they simultaneously unleashed destructive powers that may one day bring about the annihilation of our planet. Concurrently, doctors and allied scientists have delved into the deep secrets of the body and mind, mastering the anatomy and physiology of the human body, even mapping the very molecules that make us who we are. But make no mistake, a person is not simply an elegant b- logical machine to be marveled at then dissected.

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