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Demeure by Maurice Blanchot

Title Demeure
Author Maurice Blanchot
Publisher Stanford University Press
Release 2000
Category Philosophy
Total Pages 114
ISBN 9780804733267
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This volume, a powerful short prose piece by Blanchot with an extended essay by Derrida, records a remarkable encounter in critical and philosophical thinking.

The Instant of My Death Demeure by Maurice Blanchot

Title The Instant of My Death Demeure
Author Maurice Blanchot
Publisher
Release 2000
Category History in literature
Total Pages 100
ISBN 9780804733250
Language English, Spanish, and French
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The Instant of My Death by Maurice Blanchot

Title The Instant of My Death
Author Maurice Blanchot
Publisher
Release 2002
Category
Total Pages
ISBN
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Later Derrida by Herman Rapaport

Title Later Derrida
Author Herman Rapaport
Publisher Routledge
Release 2013-09-05
Category Philosophy
Total Pages 160
ISBN 1135776075
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"First Published in 2002, Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company."

Theory After Theory by Nicholas Birns

Title Theory After Theory
Author Nicholas Birns
Publisher Broadview Press
Release 2010-06-14
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 352
ISBN 1770482539
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Theory After Theory provides an overview of developments in literary theory after 1950. It is intended both as a handbook for readers to learn about theory and an intellectual history of the recent past in literary criticism for those interested in seeing how it fits in with the larger culture. Accessible but rigorous, this book provides a wealth of historical and intellectual context that allows the reader to make sense of the movements in recent literary theory.

Time in Exile by Marcia Sá Cavalcante Schuback

Title Time in Exile
Author Marcia Sá Cavalcante Schuback
Publisher SUNY Press
Release 2020-02-10
Category Philosophy
Total Pages 182
ISBN 1438478194
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Proposes a theoretically rich treatment of temporality within exile as "gerundive" time. This book is a philosophical reflection on the experience of time from within exile. Its focus on temporality is unique, as most literature on exile focuses on the experience of space, as exile involves dislocation, and moods of nostalgia and utopia. Marcia Sá Cavalcante Schuback proposes that in exile, time is experienced neither as longing back to the lost past nor as wanting a future to come but rather as a present without anchors or supports. She articulates this present as a “gerundive” mode, in which the one who is in exile discovers herself simply being, exposed to the uncanny experience of having lost the past and not having a future. To explore this, she establishes a conversation among three authors whose work has exemplified this sense of gerundive time: the German philosopher Martin Heidegger, the French writer and essayist Maurice Blanchot, and the Brazilian writer Clarice Lispector. The book does not aim to discuss how these authors understand the relation between time and exile, but presents a conversation with them in relation to this question that reflects new aspects in their work. Attempting to think and express this difficult sense of time from within exile, Time in Exile engages with the relation between thought and language, and between philosophy and literature. Departing from concrete existential questions, Sá Cavalcante Schuback reveals new philosophical and theoretical modes to understand what it means to be present in times of exile. Marcia Sá Cavalcante Schuback is Professor of Philosophy at Södertörn University in Sweden. She is the author, editor, and coeditor of many books, including (with Tora Lane) Dis-orientations: Philosophy, Literature and Lost Grounds of Modernity.

Derrida s Secret by Charles Barbour

Title Derrida s Secret
Author Charles Barbour
Publisher Edinburgh University Press
Release 2017-06-02
Category Philosophy
Total Pages 304
ISBN 147442502X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The Snowden Affair, Wikileaks, the 'lone wolf' terrorist, Clinton's private email account - the secret is arguably the central element of our contemporary political experience. Now, Charles Barbour looks at the basic ontological question 'what is a secret?' Organised as a reflection on Jacques Derrida's later writings on secrecy, four chapters each look at a separate problematic: society and the oath, literature and testimony, philosophy and deception, and time and death. Barbour shows that secrecy is not a negation of our relations with others, but a necessary condition of those relations. We can only reveal ourselves to one another (and, indeed, to anything other) insofar as we conceal as well.

Killing Times by David Wills

Title Killing Times
Author David Wills
Publisher Fordham Univ Press
Release 2019-03-05
Category Philosophy
Total Pages 288
ISBN 0823283518
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Killing Times begins with the deceptively simple observation—made by Jacques Derrida in his seminars on the topic—that the death penalty mechanically interrupts mortal time by preempting the typical mortal experience of not knowing at what precise moment we will die. Through a broader examination of what constitutes mortal temporality, David Wills proposes that the so-called machinery of death summoned by the death penalty works by exploiting, or perverting, the machinery of time that is already attached to human existence. Time, Wills argues, functions for us in general as a prosthetic technology, but the application of the death penalty represents a new level of prosthetic intervention into what constitutes the human. Killing Times traces the logic of the death penalty across a range of sites. Starting with the legal cases whereby American courts have struggled to articulate what methods of execution constitute “cruel and unusual punishment,” Wills goes on to show the ways that technologies of death have themselves evolved in conjunction with ideas of cruelty and instantaneity, from the development of the guillotine and the trap door for hanging, through the firing squad and the electric chair, through today’s controversies surrounding lethal injection. Responding to the legal system’s repeated recourse to storytelling—prosecutors’ and politicians’ endless recounting of the horrors of crimes—Wills gives a careful eye to the narrative, even fictive spaces that surround crime and punishment. Many of the controversies surrounding capital punishment, Wills argues, revolve around the complex temporality of the death penalty: how its instant works in conjunction with forms of suspension, or extension of time; how its seeming correlation between egregious crime and painless execution is complicated by a number of different discourses. By pinpointing the temporal technology that marks the death penalty, Wills is able to show capital punishment’s expansive reach, tracing the ways it has come to govern not only executions within the judicial system, but also the opposed but linked categories of the suicide bombing and drone warfare. In discussing the temporal technology of death, Wills elaborates the workings both of the terrorist who produces a simultaneity of crime and “punishment” that bypasses judicial process, and of the security state, in whose remote-control killings the time-space coordinates of “justice” are compressed and at the same time disappear into the black hole of secrecy. Grounded in a deep ethical and political commitment to death penalty abolition, Wills’s engaging and powerfully argued book pushes the question of capital punishment beyond the confines of legal argument to show how the technology of capital punishment defines and appropriates the instant of death and reconfigures the whole of human mortality.

Title Modern Literature and the Death Penalty 1890 1950
Author Katherine Ebury
Publisher Springer Nature
Release 2020
Category American literature
Total Pages 282
ISBN 3030527506
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This book examines how the cultural and ethical power of literature offered early twentieth-century readers opportunities for thinking through capital punishment in the UK, Ireland and the US in the period between 1890 and 1950. Modern Literature and the Death Penalty, 1890-1950 therefore considers how connections between high and popular culture seem particularly inextricable where the death penalty is at stake. This book will consider a range of forms, including: short stories; pulp fiction; detective fiction; plays; polemic; criminological and psychoanalytic tracts; letters and memoirs by condemned persons and by executioners; and major works of canonical literature by authors including James Joyce, Theodore Dreiser, Elizabeth Bowen, Graham Greene, Flann OBrien. Cases of the death penalty that sparked particular public debate and had substantial literary influence are explored, including the Roger Casement Case (UK (Ireland) 1916), the Edith Thompson case (UK, 1923) and the Leopold and Loeb case (USA, 1924). .

Title Language and Negativity in European Modernism
Author Shane Weller
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release 2018-11-30
Category Fiction
Total Pages 280
ISBN 1108475027
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This book proposes that a distinct strain of literary modernism emerged in Europe in response to historical catastrophe.

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