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The View from Flyover Country by Sarah Kendzior

Title The View from Flyover Country
Author Sarah Kendzior
Publisher Flatiron Books
Release 2018-04-17
Category Political Science
Total Pages 224
ISBN 1250189985
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

NEW YORK TIMES and MIBA BESTSELLER From the St. Louis–based journalist often credited with first predicting Donald Trump’s presidential victory. "A collection of sharp-edged, humanistic pieces about the American heartland...Passionate pieces that repeatedly assail the inability of many to empathize and to humanize." — Kirkus In 2015, Sarah Kendzior collected the essays she reported for Al Jazeera and published them as The View from Flyover Country, which became an ebook bestseller and garnered praise from readers around the world. Now, The View from Flyover Country is being released in print with an updated introduction and epilogue that reflect on the ways that the Trump presidency was the certain result of the realities first captured in Kendzior’s essays. A clear-eyed account of the realities of life in America’s overlooked heartland, The View from Flyover Country is a piercing critique of the labor exploitation, race relations, gentrification, media bias, and other aspects of the post-employment economy that gave rise to a president who rules like an autocrat. The View from Flyover Country is necessary reading for anyone who believes that the only way for America to fix its problems is to first discuss them with honesty and compassion. “Please put everything aside and try to get ahold of Sarah Kendzior’s collected essays, The View from Flyover Country. I have rarely come across writing that is as urgent and beautifully expressed. What makes Kendzior’s writing so truly important is [that] it . . . documents where the problem lies, by somebody who lives there.”—The Wire “Sarah Kendzior is as harsh and tenacious a critic of the Trump administration as you’ll find. She isn’t some new kid on the political block or a controversy machine. . . .Rather she is a widely published journalist and anthropologist who has spent much of her life studying authoritarianism.” —Columbia Tribune

Midland by Michael Croley

Title Midland
Author Michael Croley
Publisher Simon and Schuster
Release 2020-09-08
Category Political Science
Total Pages 256
ISBN 1982147784
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Leading journalists between the coasts offer perspectives on immigration, drug addiction, climate change, and more that you won’t find in national mainstream media. After the 2016 presidential election, the national media fretted over what they could have missed in the middle of the country, launching a thousand think pieces about so-called “Trump Country.” Yet in 2020, the polling was way off—again. Journalists between the coasts could only shake their heads at the persistence of the false narratives around the communities where they lived and worked. Contributor Ted Genoways foresaw how close the election in 2016 would be and, in its aftermath, put out a public call on Facebook, calling on writers from those midland states to help answer the national media’s puzzlement. Representing a true cross-section of America, both geographically and ethnically, these writers highlight the diversity of the American experience in essays and articles that tell the hidden local truths behind the national headlines. For instance: -Esther Honig describes the effects of the immigration crackdown in Colorado -C.J. Janovy writes about the challenges of being an LGBTQ+ activist in Kansas -Karen Coates and Valeria Fernández show us the children harvesting our food -And Sydney Boles chronicles a miner’s protest in Kentucky. For readers willing to look at the American experience that the pundits don’t know about or cover, Midland is an invaluable peek into the hearts and minds of largely unheard Americans.

Title Memoirs and Political Observations of a Midwestern W A S P
Author Michael A. Sullenger
Publisher
Release 2019-11-18
Category Political Science
Total Pages 238
ISBN 9781098009809
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Michael A. Sullenger was born and raised in a small Southern Indiana town. Over the years, his travels and education, coupled with his Christian upbringing and his undergraduate and postgraduate studies, have cultivated his personal political views. Those views and observations are the focus of this book. His perspective is that of someone raised with Midwestern and Christian values, which he feels differs greatly from those on the East and West Coasts, as well as in most large cities. Those who have lived their lives through their school years and into early adulthood have a moral view of life and what it means to be a responsible citizen who contributes to our American society that clearly differs from the liberal members of our country. He asks straightforward questions that deal with our current political direction, from a Christian point of view. He also points out fallacies that are ever present in today's political system, along with challenging today's Christians to evaluate the politicians and political party they support against the biblical teachings in the Old and New Testament, as well as the Ten Commandments. If you find they fall short of those teachings, maybe a change is in order.

Title Memoirs and Political Observations of a Midwestern W A S P
Author Michael Sullenger
Publisher Christian Faith Publishing, Inc.
Release 2020-04-06
Category Political Science
Total Pages 236
ISBN 1098009819
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Michael A. Sullenger was born and raised in a small Southern Indiana town. Over the years, his travels and education, coupled with his Christian upbringing and his undergraduate and postgraduate studies, have cultivated his personal political views. Those views and observations are the focus of this book. His perspective is that of someone raised with Midwestern and Christian values, which he feels differs greatly from those on the East and West Coasts, as well as in most large cities. Those who have lived their lives through their school years and into early adulthood have a moral view of life and what it means to be a responsible citizen who contributes to our American society that clearly differs from the liberal members of our country. He asks straightforward questions that deal with our current political direction, from a Christian point of view. He also points out fallacies that are ever present in today's political system, along with challenging today's Christians to evaluate the politicians and political party they support against the biblical teachings in the Old and New Testament, as well as the Ten Commandments. If you find they fall short of those teachings, maybe a change is in order.

Flyover Country by Christopher Harper

Title Flyover Country
Author Christopher Harper
Publisher Government Institutes
Release 2010-12-02
Category History
Total Pages 150
ISBN 9780761853336
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This book focuses on a group of baby boomers who graduated from high school in 1969, entering the world in a time of turbulence to fight in Vietnam, to protest against that war, to find jobs, to have families, and to live lives throughout the United States and overseas.

Title Beyond Foucault Excursions in Political Genealogy
Author Michael Clifford
Publisher MDPI
Release 2018-10-15
Category Social Science
Total Pages 140
ISBN 3038972444
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This book is a printed edition of the Special Issue "Beyond Foucault: Excursions in Political Genealogy" that was published in Genealogy

The Heartland by Kristin L. Hoganson

Title The Heartland
Author Kristin L. Hoganson
Publisher Penguin
Release 2019-04-23
Category History
Total Pages 432
ISBN 0525561625
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A history of a quintessentially American place--the rural and small town heartland--that uncovers deep yet hidden currents of connection with the world. When Kristin L. Hoganson arrived in Champaign, Illinois, after teaching at Harvard, studying at Yale, and living in the D.C. metro area with various stints overseas, she expected to find her new home, well, isolated. Even provincial. After all, she had landed in the American heartland, a place where the nation's identity exists in its pristine form. Or so we have been taught to believe. Struck by the gap between reputation and reality, she determined to get to the bottom of history and myth. The deeper she dug into the making of the modern heartland, the wider her story became as she realized that she'd uncovered an unheralded crossroads of people, commerce, and ideas. But the really interesting thing, Hoganson found, was that over the course of American history, even as the region's connections with the rest of the planet became increasingly dense and intricate, the idea of the rural Midwest as a steadfast heartland became a stronger and more stubbornly immovable myth. In enshrining a symbolic heart, the American people have repressed the kinds of stories that Hoganson tells, of sweeping breadth and depth and soul. In The Heartland, Kristin L. Hoganson drills deep into the center of the country, only to find a global story in the resulting core sample. Deftly navigating the disconnect between history and myth, she tracks both the backstory of this region and the evolution of the idea of an unalloyed heart at the center of the land. A provocative and highly original work of historical scholarship, The Heartland speaks volumes about pressing preoccupations, among them identity and community, immigration and trade, and security and global power. And food. To read it is to be inoculated against using the word "heartland" unironically ever again.

Rust by Eliese Colette Goldbach

Title Rust
Author Eliese Colette Goldbach
Publisher Flatiron Books
Release 2020-03-03
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 320
ISBN 1250239397
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"Elements of Tara Westover’s Educated... The mill comes to represent something holy to [Eliese] because it is made not of steel but of people." —New York Times Book Review One woman's story of working in the backbreaking steel industry to rebuild her life—but what she uncovers in the mill is much more than molten metal and grueling working conditions. Under the mill's orange flame she finds hope for the unity of America. Steel is the only thing that shines in the belly of the mill... To ArcelorMittal Steel Eliese is known as #6691: Utility Worker, but this was never her dream. Fresh out of college, eager to leave behind her conservative hometown and come to terms with her Christian roots, Eliese found herself applying for a job at the local steel mill. The mill is everything she was trying to escape, but it's also her only shot at financial security in an economically devastated and forgotten part of America. In Rust, Eliese brings the reader inside the belly of the mill and the middle American upbringing that brought her there in the first place. She takes a long and intimate look at her Rust Belt childhood and struggles to reconcile her desire to leave without turning her back on the people she's come to love. The people she sees as the unsung backbone of our nation. Faced with the financial promise of a steelworker’s paycheck, and the very real danger of working in an environment where a steel coil could crush you at any moment or a vat of molten iron could explode because of a single drop of water, Eliese finds unexpected warmth and camaraderie among the gruff men she labors beside each day. Appealing to readers of Hillbilly Elegy and Educated, Rust is a story of the humanity Eliese discovers in the most unlikely and hellish of places, and the hope that therefore begins to grow.

New Approaches to Islam in Film by Kristian Petersen

Title New Approaches to Islam in Film
Author Kristian Petersen
Publisher Routledge
Release 2021-03-31
Category Religion
Total Pages 248
ISBN 1351189131
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Many global film industries fail in expanding the role of Muslims on screen. Too often they produce a dichotomy between "good" and "bad" Muslims, limiting the narrative domain to issues of national security, war, and terrorism. Naturally, much of the previous scholarship on Muslims in film focused on stereotypes and the politics of representation. This collection of essays, from an international panel of contributors, significantly expands the boundaries of discussion around Muslims in film, asking new questions of the archive and magnifying analyses of particular cultural productions. The volume includes the exploration of regional cinemas, detailed analysis of auteurs and individual films, comparison across global cinema, and new explorations that have not yet entered the conversation. The interdisciplinary collection provides an examination of the multiple roles Islam plays in film and the various ways Muslims are depicted. Across the chapters, key intersecting themes arise that push the limits of how we currently approach issues of Muslims in cinema and ventures to lead us in new directions for future scholarship. This book adds new depth to the matrix of previous scholarship by revisiting methodological structures and sources, as well as exploring new visual geographies, transnational circuits, and approaches. It reframes the presiding scholarly conventions in five novel trajectories: considering new sources, exploring new communities, probing new perspectives, charting new theoretical directions, and offering new ways of understanding conflict in cinema. As such, it will be of great use to scholars working in Islamic Studies, Film Studies, Religious Studies, and Media.

Deplorable by Mary E. Stuckey

Title Deplorable
Author Mary E. Stuckey
Publisher Penn State Press
Release 2021-11-09
Category History
Total Pages 328
ISBN 0271092017
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Political campaigns in the United States, especially those for the presidency, can be nasty—very nasty. And while we would like to believe that the 2020 election was an aberration, insults, invective, and yes, even violence have characterized US electoral politics since the republic’s early days. By examining the political discourse around nine particularly deplorable elections, Mary E. Stuckey seeks to explain why. From the contest that pitted Thomas Jefferson against John Adams in 1800 through 2020’s vicious, chaotic matchup between Donald Trump and Joe Biden, Stuckey documents the cycle of despicable discourse in presidential campaigns. Looking beyond the character and the ideology of the candidates, Stuckey explores the broader political, economic, and cultural milieus in which each took place. In doing so, she reveals the conditions that exacerbate and enable our worst political instincts, producing discourses that incite factions, target members of the polity, encourage undemocratic policy, and actively work against the national democratic project. Keenly analytical and compulsively readable, Deplorable provides context for the 2016 and 2020 elections, revealing them as part of a cyclical—and perhaps downward-spiraling—pattern in American politics. Deplorable offers more than a comparison of the worst of our elections. It helps us understand these shameful and disappointing moments in our political history, leaving one important question: Can we avoid them in the future?

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